Press "Enter" to skip to content

Mayor proclaims Friday HBCU Day in Baltimore


REVEREND DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. VICE PRESIDENT HARRIS TV PIONEER AND PHILANTHROPIST AND ONCE A BALTIMOREAN OPRAH WINFREY PRODUCES SPIKE LEE NFL HALL OF FAMER AND FORMER BALTIMORE RAVENS SHANNON SHARP AND BALTIMORE’S OWN THURGOOD MARSHALL ON THIS H BC DAY IN BALTIMORE. MAYOR, BRANDON SCOTT NAMING SOME OF JOINED IN THE CELEBRATION AT CITY HALL BY STUDENTS AND ALUMS OF THOSE SCHOOLS NATIONALLY WHILE PREDOMINANTLY WHITE SCHOOLS HAVE SEEN ENROLLMENT GOING DOWN HBCUS HAVE SEEN THEIR NUMBERS INCREASE TWO YEARS AGO. WE WERE 7900 STUDENTS AND WE ARE AT OFFICIALLY 9,000 600 PLUS STUDENTS AT THE NATIONAL TREASURE MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY. KEVIN BANKS VICE PRESIDENT FOR DIVERSITY WE’VE SEEN AN INCREASE IN IN SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES AND A LOT OF STUDENTS WHO WATCH THAT FROM THEIR LIVING ROOMS ON THEIR COMPUTERS BEHIND THOSE BOXES SAID THAT YOU ALONE FOR IS ALWAYS SOMEONE WHO HAS A SIMILAR EXPERIENCE TO YOU OR LIKE CAN RELATE TO YOU IN SOME WAY? I THINK IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT. TO COME TO COME TO HBCU BECAUSE THE CULTURE KNOWING MY PEOPLE. NOW STUDENTS. I SPOKE TO SAY WHO WENT TO A PREDOMINANTLY WHITE HIGH SCHOOL SAY IT WAS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT FOR THEM TO COME TO AN HBCU LIKE MORGAN.

HBCU Day in Baltimore celebrates legacy, history, culture on campus

Baltimore is recognizing the historic legacies of Historically Black Colleges and Universities.Mayor Brandon Scott proclaimed Friday to be HBCU Day, during which he also saluted Coppin State University in west Baltimore and Morgan State University in northeast Baltimore.The mayor named some of the successful people who were educated at HBCUs, including the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Vice President Kamala Harris, Oprah Winfrey, Spike Lee, Shannon Sharpe and Thurgood Marshall.He was joined in the celebration at City Hall by students and alumni of HBCUs. Nationally, while predominantly white schools have seen decreasing enrollment, HBCUs have seen theirs increase.”Two years ago, we were at 7,900 students. We’re at 9,600-plus at Morgan State University,” said Kevin Banks, Morgan’s vice president of student affairs. “We’ve seen an increase in social justice issues, and a lot of students watched that from their living room on those computers and say, ‘You know what? I think I want to experience an HBCU where maybe I’m not confronted with those issues on a daily basis.'”Some Morgan students told 11 News they wanted a place where they could feel at home with people who like them.”You never feel like you’re alone. There’s always someone who had a similar experience to you and can relate to you in some way,” said Kashmir Butler, a Morgan freshman.”I think it was very important for me to come to an HBCU because the culture, knowing my people,” said Tyriek Francois, a Morgan sophomore.Students who said they attended a predominantly white high school said it was especially important to them to attend an HBCU.Sept. 20-23 is National HBCU Week.

Baltimore is recognizing the historic legacies of Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Mayor Brandon Scott proclaimed Friday to be HBCU Day, during which he also saluted Coppin State University in west Baltimore and Morgan State University in northeast Baltimore.

The mayor named some of the successful people who were educated at HBCUs, including the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Vice President Kamala Harris, Oprah Winfrey, Spike Lee, Shannon Sharpe and Thurgood Marshall.

He was joined in the celebration at City Hall by students and alumni of HBCUs. Nationally, while predominantly white schools have seen decreasing enrollment, HBCUs have seen theirs increase.

“Two years ago, we were at 7,900 students. We’re at 9,600-plus at Morgan State University,” said Kevin Banks, Morgan’s vice president of student affairs. “We’ve seen an increase in social justice issues, and a lot of students watched that from their living room on those computers and say, ‘You know what? I think I want to experience an HBCU where maybe I’m not confronted with those issues on a daily basis.'”

Some Morgan students told 11 News they wanted a place where they could feel at home with people who like them.

“You never feel like you’re alone. There’s always someone who had a similar experience to you and can relate to you in some way,” said Kashmir Butler, a Morgan freshman.

“I think it was very important for me to come to an HBCU because the culture, knowing my people,” said Tyriek Francois, a Morgan sophomore.

Students who said they attended a predominantly white high school said it was especially important to them to attend an HBCU.

Sept. 20-23 is National HBCU Week.



Source link

Mission News Theme by Compete Themes.