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Man convicted of murder more than 30 years ago could go free



This week, a Maryland law that played a big role in Adnan Syed’s release, could result in a similar fate for a man in a very different case.On Friday, the Juvenile Restoration Act could help release a man convicted of murder more than 30 years ago.In 1988, 16-Year-Old Marc Uher was a junior at Linganore High School in Frederick County. “Even after 34 years, I’ve tried to remember if I saw him in school, just even in the hall, before John executed him,” said Cassandra Thompson, a friend of Uher.Uher’s friend, then 17-year-old John Sexton, was convicted of murder in his death and sentenced to life-in-prison.In 2019, WBAL-TV 11 News met Sexton while he was working with service dogs inside a Maryland Correctional Institute.”This is definitely an opportunity to do as much as I can to provide some kind of meaningful something in this world,” Sexton said to 11 News in 2019.This Friday, the now 50-year-old will request his sentence be reconsidered.”It’s not fair. John even has the remotest possibility of getting a second chance. Mark never even got to graduate high school,” Thompson said.It comes in the context of a new state law passed last year — the Juvenile Restoration Act, which bans life without parole for juvenile offenders in Maryland.Brian Saccenti is the director of The Decarceration Initiative.”Permits people who were under 18 at the time of the crime and who’ve served at least 20 years in prison to file motions asking judges to reduce their sentences and release them from incarceration,” Saccenti said.That’s if the judge finds they don’t pose a danger and it’s in the interest of justice.That law played a big role in Syed’s release. Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby said the act led her office to find “several problematic issues” in his file that turned into a new investigation.In Sexton’s case, his legal team states he’s “matured and reformed since the crime.”Now they want to see his sentence reduced. Thompson disagrees.”He was 17 years old. He made a man’s choice – and his decision was to execute his friend,” Thompson said.Sexton’s attorney said in a statement: “Mr. Sexton is a good example of how children who commit serious offenses can mature, rehabilitate, and become truly good people. He is deeply remorseful for the life he took and the pain he’s caused. In the 33 years he has been in prison, he has become a model citizen.”Sexton will have his hearing this Friday in Frederick County Circuit Court.

This week, a Maryland law that played a big role in Adnan Syed’s release, could result in a similar fate for a man in a very different case.

On Friday, the Juvenile Restoration Act could help release a man convicted of murder more than 30 years ago.

In 1988, 16-Year-Old Marc Uher was a junior at Linganore High School in Frederick County.

“Even after 34 years, I’ve tried to remember if I saw him in school, just even in the hall, before John executed him,” said Cassandra Thompson, a friend of Uher.

Uher’s friend, then 17-year-old John Sexton, was convicted of murder in his death and sentenced to life-in-prison.

In 2019, WBAL-TV 11 News met Sexton while he was working with service dogs inside a Maryland Correctional Institute.

“This is definitely an opportunity to do as much as I can to provide some kind of meaningful something in this world,” Sexton said to 11 News in 2019.

This Friday, the now 50-year-old will request his sentence be reconsidered.

“It’s not fair. John even has the remotest possibility of getting a second chance. Mark never even got to graduate high school,” Thompson said.

It comes in the context of a new state law passed last year — the Juvenile Restoration Act, which bans life without parole for juvenile offenders in Maryland.

Brian Saccenti is the director of The Decarceration Initiative.

“Permits people who were under 18 at the time of the crime and who’ve served at least 20 years in prison to file motions asking judges to reduce their sentences and release them from incarceration,” Saccenti said.

That’s if the judge finds they don’t pose a danger and it’s in the interest of justice.

That law played a big role in Syed’s release. Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby said the act led her office to find “several problematic issues” in his file that turned into a new investigation.

In Sexton’s case, his legal team states he’s “matured and reformed since the crime.”

Now they want to see his sentence reduced. Thompson disagrees.

“He was 17 years old. He made a man’s choice – and his decision was to execute his friend,” Thompson said.

Sexton’s attorney said in a statement: “Mr. Sexton is a good example of how children who commit serious offenses can mature, rehabilitate, and become truly good people. He is deeply remorseful for the life he took and the pain he’s caused. In the 33 years he has been in prison, he has become a model citizen.”

Sexton will have his hearing this Friday in Frederick County Circuit Court.



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