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Kristi Lee inducted into Indiana Broadcast Pioneers Hall of Fame


INDIANAPOLIS — She’s a star behind the scenes and in front of the camera and she’s a Hoosier through and through.

Kristi Lee recently returned to WRTV for the first time since she left as a WRTV Technical Director and discussed her career with WRTV’s Megan Shinn.

“I was so looking forward to this day, I know I shouldn’t have waited thirty years, or whatever it’s been,” Lee said.

It’s changed a lot, but for Lee, the rooms and halls still hold cherished memories and familiar faces.

“I really loved working here. I loved all of the people here. I was blessed to have that opportunity,” Lee said.

She credits her time at WRTV to good advice during her years at Ben Davis High School.

“(I) ended up here (WRTV) on a fluke,” Lee said. “My high school radio teacher said you should get a first-class FCC license and back then, a lot of TV stations required an FCC first-class to work there.”

Out of the blue, Lee said WRTV’s former chief engineer called her.

“I said I’ve never been in a TV station,” Lee said. “(They responded), ‘That’s ok, just come on down, we’ll just talk’.”

Looking back, Lee realizes she’s one of the first female engineers, at an Indy television station.

When asked if she considers herself a trailblazer, Lee was quick to answer.

“No, heck no. I didn’t know what I was doing,” Lee said. “I just came and Dick Pratt goes do you want a job, and I go sure I’ll try it.”

For nearly seven years on the job, Kristi worked as a Technical Director.

“Three of us would sit in a room and then there would be a news producer behind us, screaming at the director the whole time, and the director would then scream at me and we would put a newscast together.” She said, “It was the power days, Ed Sorensen, Tom Carnegie.”

Now Lee’s joining broadcast legends on the Indiana Broadcast Pioneers Hall of Fame.

“I think the thing that really stands out for me, and I’m honored and humbled by the award,” Lee said. “But the fact that I was born here, raised here, and always worked here, makes it really special.”

Her journey takes her from news and TV to sports and of course, The Bob and Tom Show, on the radio.

“A lot of people don’t know I was on TV for ESPN, ESPN2, Pacers,” Lee said. “I got to do a lot of things. I got to do a lot. So, I was very very lucky.”

It’s non-stop work over decades.

“I was with Bob and Tom, I would go catch a flight on Friday, and work for ESPN and work whatever they had me do that weekend and fly back on Sunday morning,” Lee said. “So, I usually got Sunday afternoons off. That was it, for a long time.”

Now she works much more than the four hours of live radio time, people watch her on.

The Bob and Tom show broadcasts nationally and internationally. Now she’s a co-host and the News Director.

“I’m the only person in the News Department, so I can say whatever title I want,” said Lee. “I call myself a comedy writer. I write the straight stuff (laughs) and then they go from there.”

It was syndicated in 1995 and Lee credits team chemistry for its decades of success.

“They’re my family. I’m with them more than I’m with my own family,” Lee said. “No matter what is going on in your life, me personally, or my cast members, when we walk in that door, it’s all forgotten.”

Their presence generates a comedy-based morning show people turn to for an emotional release.

“And that’s why I’m in this business, that’s why this show is good, and that’s why I continue to do it and will continue,” Lee said. “I’m not retiring, never, ever.”

It’s a dedication earning her a spot forever as a Hall of Famer.





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Many aren’t aware there is a new COVID-19 booster. Here’s why



According to a study done by the Kaiser Family Foundation, 51% of adults haven’t heard much about the new COVID-19 booster. “I think that many people have the impression that this problem is over,” health expert Dr. Barry Ramo said. Ramo points to comments made by our president as one of the reasons. “I think when the president said the pandemic is over, he was saying that we’re going to a more normal type of life. But the problem is not gone. It’s still here and the danger is still there for people at high risk,” Ramo said.The overload of information being shared about flu and COVID-19 vaccines at the same time is another reason Ramo believes people are not aware of the vaccine. “I’m not surprised that people are confused. It was because they were talking about flu shots. They’re talking about boosters,” Ramo said. The new COVID-19 booster was authorized before being tested on people. Trials performed on people will be released later this year, according to the Food and Drug Administration. “This is a minor modification of the previous booster, and there’s no reasonable claims that it’s not safe,” he said. Ramo also says flu season this year is expected to be worse than previous years because mask mandates have been lifted. He recommends getting a flu shot this year. Watch the video above for the full story.

According to a study done by the Kaiser Family Foundation, 51% of adults haven’t heard much about the new COVID-19 booster.

“I think that many people have the impression that this problem is over,” health expert Dr. Barry Ramo said.

Ramo points to comments made by our president as one of the reasons.

“I think when the president said the pandemic is over, he was saying that we’re going to a more normal type of life. But the problem is not gone. It’s still here and the danger is still there for people at high risk,” Ramo said.

The overload of information being shared about flu and COVID-19 vaccines at the same time is another reason Ramo believes people are not aware of the vaccine.

“I’m not surprised that people are confused. It was because they were talking about flu shots. They’re talking about boosters,” Ramo said.

The new COVID-19 booster was authorized before being tested on people. Trials performed on people will be released later this year, according to the Food and Drug Administration.

“This is a minor modification of the previous booster, and there’s no reasonable claims that it’s not safe,” he said.

Ramo also says flu season this year is expected to be worse than previous years because mask mandates have been lifted.

He recommends getting a flu shot this year.

Watch the video above for the full story.




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Ask questions about Nov 8, 2022 midterm election in Kentucky


Voters cast their ballots during Kentucky’s Primary Election Day, Tuesday May 17, 2022, at the Fairway precinct in Lexington, Ky. We’d like to know what questions you have about the general election.

Voters cast their ballots during Kentucky’s Primary Election Day, Tuesday May 17, 2022, at the Fairway precinct in Lexington, Ky. We’d like to know what questions you have about the general election.

bsimms@herald-leader.com

Voters in Kentucky will head to the polls Nov. 8 to participate in a slew of local, state and federal races, and the Herald-Leader would like to help ensure you are informed before you cast your ballot.

County elections officials have begun mailing ballots to those who apply and are eligible to vote absentee by mail, and the deadline to register to vote in Kentucky is Oct. 11.

In support of a robust democracy, the Herald-Leader believes voters should have easy access to the information they need to make informed decisions at the ballot box. As such, we welcome your questions about the process, candidates, hot topics and more ahead of November.

The Herald-Leader has already begun publishing candidate guides and following key issues, but we’d like to hear from you.

You can fill out the form at the bottom of this story to share your questions or ideas. Herald-Leader reporters will be reviewing the submissions and tracking down answers to popular questions and more.

Here’s what’s on the line Nov. 8 in Kentucky

  • Perhaps the most high-profile item on November’s ballot is a state referendum on abortion, which all voters will see on their ballot. Kentucky Constitutional Amendment 2 seeks to set into state law that Kentuckians have no guaranteed right to an abortion under the state constitution. A “yes” vote supports granting the state General Assembly the sole regulatory authority on the matter and would prohibit courts from interpreting the constitution as protecting the right to an abortion. It has support among some evangelicals who are anti-abortion advocates. Groups opposing the amendment have called attention to how it does not include exceptions for rape, incest or all medically necessary interventions.
  • A second question, Kentucky Constitutional Amendment 1, is also on the ballot. A “yes” vote to Amendment 1 supports the legislature’s right to set the end date of the legislative calendar, allowing elected officials to call themselves back for a special session of 12 days, regardless of the governor’s wishes. A “no” vote would retain the end dates set in the constitution. A key factor in the constitutional amendment is that it would allow the legislature to return to override a governor’s veto.
  • All Kentucky voters will also see the midterm’s U.S. Senate race on ballot. Incumbent Rand Paul, R-Ky., is facing off against Democrat Charles Booker.
  • Also on the ballot are races for the U.S. House, State Senate and State House. Fayette County matchups include Incumbent Andy Barr, R-Ky., and Democrat nominee Geoff Young for the U.S. House and incumbent Republican Donald Douglas and Democratic Party nominee Chuck Eddy for the Kentucky Senate’s District 22 seat.
  • Voters will also make decisions in county races, like clerk, coroner, sheriff and more.
  • Lexington has a number of city races, including mayor and city council.

What questions to do you have about the Nov. 8 election?

As Election Day gets closer, we’d like to know what questions you have and what topics you’d like to hear more candidates discuss.

Fill out the form below or email ask@herald-leader.com. We may use your questions or comments in stories to better inform readers or share feedback.

Jackie Starkey is the service journalism editor for the Lexington Herald-Leader, Centre Daily Times and Belleville News-Democrat. She is a graduate of UNC Asheville and previously worked for the Carteret County News-Times in coastal North Carolina. She is based at the Herald-Leader in Lexington.





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New AI technology helps doctors detect breast cancer



October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer faster and more accurately.Sister stationKMBC 9 found out how it works and talked to a survivor sharing her message about the importance of early detection. A tiny tumor can be hard to see with the naked eye, but new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer earlier than ever before. “Sometimes cancer is really obvious, but a lot of times it can be very subtle changes,” said Dr. Ruby Meierotto, a breast radiologist at Saint Luke’s Cancer Institute. An artificial intelligence program called Profound AI uses algorithms to identify potential cancer in mammograms.Meierotto and her team are using this new weapon in the battle against breast cancer. “Studies show that radiologists who interpret with Profound AI find more cancers, have fewer false positives … and then can interpret mammograms in less time,” she said. Meierotto says early detection through annual mammograms is key.“The question is, are you going to know when it’s a teeny tiny treatable stage zero stage one cancer? Are you going to wait until it’s progressed and metastasized, you know, with a less than 20% survival rate?” she asked. Meghan Geivett is living proof that early detection saves lives. She was diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer after her first routine mammogram at age 40. After chemotherapy and a double mastectomy, she’s now in remission. She says getting diagnosed with breast cancer was the last thing she expected.“I didn’t have a lump. I didn’t have any pain. I didn’t have anything that caused me to think I was gonna have breast cancer when I went in for my mammogram,” she said. Doctors found four cancerous tumors, though. Geivett also didn’t have family history of breast cancer. Doctors say three in four breast cancer patients don’t have family history, but some still use that as an excuse to put off testing.“In Megan’s case, had she waited, she may not be here today to tell her story,” Meierotto said.Geivett is sharing her story as a warning to others.“You can be young, you can be healthy, you can look great on the outside, but you have no idea what’s inside your body,” she said. “All you can do is get checked.”Watch the video above for the full story.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer faster and more accurately.

Sister stationKMBC 9 found out how it works and talked to a survivor sharing her message about the importance of early detection.

A tiny tumor can be hard to see with the naked eye, but new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer earlier than ever before.

“Sometimes cancer is really obvious, but a lot of times it can be very subtle changes,” said Dr. Ruby Meierotto, a breast radiologist at Saint Luke’s Cancer Institute.

An artificial intelligence program called Profound AI uses algorithms to identify potential cancer in mammograms.

Meierotto and her team are using this new weapon in the battle against breast cancer.

“Studies show that radiologists who interpret with Profound AI find more cancers, have fewer false positives … and then can interpret mammograms in less time,” she said.

Meierotto says early detection through annual mammograms is key.

“The question is, are you going to know when it’s a teeny tiny treatable stage zero stage one cancer? Are you going to wait until it’s progressed and metastasized, you know, with a less than 20% survival rate?” she asked.

Meghan Geivett is living proof that early detection saves lives. She was diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer after her first routine mammogram at age 40. After chemotherapy and a double mastectomy, she’s now in remission.

She says getting diagnosed with breast cancer was the last thing she expected.

“I didn’t have a lump. I didn’t have any pain. I didn’t have anything that caused me to think I was gonna have breast cancer when I went in for my mammogram,” she said.

Doctors found four cancerous tumors, though. Geivett also didn’t have family history of breast cancer. Doctors say three in four breast cancer patients don’t have family history, but some still use that as an excuse to put off testing.

“In Megan’s case, had she waited, she may not be here today to tell her story,” Meierotto said.

Geivett is sharing her story as a warning to others.

“You can be young, you can be healthy, you can look great on the outside, but you have no idea what’s inside your body,” she said. “All you can do is get checked.”

Watch the video above for the full story.



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Our View: Maine can’t let up against unrelenting housing crisis


Every day we get another reminder of just how bad the housing crisis is in Maine, and how the only sustainable way out of it is to build more housing.

This time it was news that MaineHousing won’t take any more applications for emergency rental assistance until it hears whether the federal government will honor a request for an additional $55 million.

The program already has spent about $275 million, helping nearly 34,000 households even after the organization tightened eligibility. However, another 11,000 applications are pending.

The money spent by the program represents the difference between what Maine residents are paying in rent and what they can afford. The demand is surprising even the folks at MaineHousing, who know too well how unaffordable housing is, particularly for those residents with the lowest incomes.

Jeanie Cannell sits on one of their coolers outside by the van where she, her husband and her stepdaughter live, just after dawn at the Kennebunk service plaza off the Maine Turnpike on Thursday, July 21, 2022. The three had just woken up and were about to head inside to get coffee from the fast food restaurant. Brianna Soukup/Staff photographer

It’s not just Maine. Housing is unaffordable nearly everywhere, and several other states also have halted rental assistance after funding was depleted from high demand.

We wonder just how bad things would be without the emergency funding. We could find out — the rental assistance is one-time money from federal COVID relief. Once it’s gone, it’s likely that federal housing assistance will return to its past, insufficient levels.

The emergency funding will go away, but the emergency will remain.

That’s why it’s so important that Maine continue to accelerate housing development. Statewide, there is a shortage as high as 25,000 units, a number that has risen steadily and predictably for years as building failed to keep up with demand.

That has made it difficult for Mainers to find housing, and put those who do in dire financial straits and on the brink of homelessness.

In fact, it is housing unaffordability caused by a shortage of affordable units that is the top factor driving the homelessness problem statewide — not addiction or mental illness, though those do play a role.

Maine has started to turn that around. Helped by an affordable housing tax credit passed by the Legislature and Gov. Janet Mills, and by cities and towns excited to see housing built in their communities, there are now more housing units being built every year, and more coming in the pipeline. MaineHousing itself developed 520 affordable units in 2021, triple the number from 2019.

More will be made possible by the housing law passed last session, which starting in July 2023 will permit additional units wherever single-family housing is allowed.

The developments already underway include affordable housing for seniors funded by a $15 million bond approved years ago by Maine voters but held back by then-Gov. Paul LePage, who is facing Mills in the November election.

The funding, put in motion by Mills in one of her first acts in office, already is helping provide safe, affordable housing to older Mainers throughout the state, a total of 200 new units. It also paid for weatherization on 100 existing homes owned by low-income seniors.

It could have done much more. In 2014, Mark Eves, then the Democratic speaker of the House, proposed a $65 million senior housing bond that would have built 1,000 units. At the time, LePage said, “I’m all in on that. I’m ready and waiting.”

But instead he helped torpedo the larger proposal then refused the sign the $15 million bond approved by voters, putting off for years projects that could have helped build housing for hundreds of Mainers.

At the gubernatorial debate on Tuesday, LePage offered only his usual tired excuse for refusing to issue the bonds. Then he said he wants to see Maine schools consolidated and the old buildings used for housing.

We wonder if we can trust him to be “all in” on that plan, too.


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A rock-solid idea to spread positivity in Billings


BILLINGS — Julie Eskandari sees the beauty in the little things and even in the not-so-beautiful things – like a rock.

She loves taking something simple and perhaps boring and transforming it into something beautiful and meaningful.

“Trying to get people to smile when they all of a sudden find a rock. It’s just like, oh wow I found something, this is cool,” Eskandari said Tuesday.

And she hides them all over Billings, like a kindness-spreading treasure hunt. This idea is nothing new— others do it in town and in cities all over, but Eskandari wants to put a new spin on it. She has decorated rocks for four different cities.

Having a daughter who just recently started school at West High School, Eskandari knows kids sometimes need a simple act to brighten their day. So, she reached out to the school and brought them 40 rocks that she’s painted, drawn on and, her special trick, temporarily tattooed.

“Who needs a smile more than a kid that’s going through hormones, friendships, ups and downs and just, you know, who needs it more than that,” she said.

And Eskandari isn’t the only one using rocks to spread kindness in Billings. There is a kindness rock garden opening Thursday in front of United Way at 2173 Overland Ave.

We work in an environment that has a lot of foot traffic and we just felt like it was a gift we could give to our community,” said CEO of United Way of Yellowstone County Kim Lewis on Wednesday.

She added: “Life is hard, everybody needs a reason to keep going and be hopeful that tomorrow can be a better day.”





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Closing arguments set in Alex Jones’ Sandy Hook trial


WATERBURY, CONN. — A Connecticut jury is expected to hear closing arguments Thursday in a trial to determine how much Infowars host Alex Jones should pay for persuading his audience that the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School was a hoax perpetrated to impose more gun control laws.

The six-person jury could begin deliberations by the day’s end in the lawsuit, one of several filed against the conspiracy theorist by relatives of the 26 people killed in the mass shooting.

Since the trial began Sept. 13, all 15 plaintiffs in the Connecticut lawsuit have testified about being tormented for a decade by people who believed Jones’ claims that the shooting never happened, and that the parents of the 20 slain children were “crisis actors.”

The plaintiffs said they have received death and rape threats, mail from conspiracy theorists that included photos of dead children, and had in-person confrontations with hoax believers. They sued Jones for defamation, intentional infliction of emotional distress and violating Connecticut’s unfair trade practices law by profiting off the hoax lies.

The people suing Jones and his company, Free Speech System, in the Connecticut case include the relatives of eight massacre victims, as well as an FBI agent who responded to the school.

Mark Barden, whose son Daniel was among the 26 victims, told the jury conspiracy theorists threatened to dig up the boy’s grave to prove the shooting never happened.

“This is so sacrosanct and hallowed a place for my family and to hear that people were desecrating it and urinating on it and threatening to dig it up, I don’t know how to articulate to you what that feels like,” Barden told the jury. “But that’s where we are.”

Jones, whose show and Infowars brand is based in Austin, Texas, was found liable for defaming the plaintiffs last year. In an unusual ruling, Judge Barbara Bellis found Jones had forfeited his right to a trial as a consequence of repeated violations of court orders and failures to turn over documents to the plaintiffs’ lawyers.

Jones took the stand for a contentious day of testimony, saying he was “done saying I’m sorry” for calling the school shooting a hoax.

Outside the courthouse and on his web show, he has repeatedly bashed the trial as a “kangaroo court” and an effort to put him out of business. He has cited free speech rights, but he and his lawyer were not allowed to make that argument during the trial because he already had been found liable.

Jones’ lawyer, Norm Pattis, has been trying to limit any damages awarded to the victims’ families and claimed the relatives were exaggerating their claims of being harmed.

In a similar trial in Texas in August, a jury ordered Jones to pay nearly $50 million in damages to the parents of one of the children killed in the shooting, because of the hoax lies. A third such trial, also in Texas, involving two other parents is expected to begin near the end of the year.

Jones has said he expects the cases to be tied up in appeals for the next two years and has asked his audience to help him raise $500,000 to pay for his legal expenses. Free Speech Systems, meanwhile, is seeking bankruptcy protection.



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New AI technology helps doctors detect breast cancer



October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer faster and more accurately.Sister stationKMBC 9 found out how it works and talked to a survivor sharing her message about the importance of early detection. A tiny tumor can be hard to see with the naked eye, but new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer earlier than ever before. “Sometimes cancer is really obvious, but a lot of times it can be very subtle changes,” said Dr. Ruby Meierotto, a breast radiologist at Saint Luke’s Cancer Institute. An artificial intelligence program called Profound AI uses algorithms to identify potential cancer in mammograms.Meierotto and her team are using this new weapon in the battle against breast cancer. “Studies show that radiologists who interpret with Profound AI find more cancers, have fewer false positives … and then can interpret mammograms in less time,” she said. Meierotto says early detection through annual mammograms is key.“The question is, are you going to know when it’s a teeny tiny treatable stage zero stage one cancer? Are you going to wait until it’s progressed and metastasized, you know, with a less than 20% survival rate?” she asked. Meghan Geivett is living proof that early detection saves lives. She was diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer after her first routine mammogram at age 40. After chemotherapy and a double mastectomy, she’s now in remission. She says getting diagnosed with breast cancer was the last thing she expected.“I didn’t have a lump. I didn’t have any pain. I didn’t have anything that caused me to think I was gonna have breast cancer when I went in for my mammogram,” she said. Doctors found four cancerous tumors, though. Geivett also didn’t have family history of breast cancer. Doctors say three in four breast cancer patients don’t have family history, but some still use that as an excuse to put off testing.“In Megan’s case, had she waited, she may not be here today to tell her story,” Meierotto said.Geivett is sharing her story as a warning to others.“You can be young, you can be healthy, you can look great on the outside, but you have no idea what’s inside your body,” she said. “All you can do is get checked.”Watch the video above for the full story.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer faster and more accurately.

Sister stationKMBC 9 found out how it works and talked to a survivor sharing her message about the importance of early detection.

A tiny tumor can be hard to see with the naked eye, but new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer earlier than ever before.

“Sometimes cancer is really obvious, but a lot of times it can be very subtle changes,” said Dr. Ruby Meierotto, a breast radiologist at Saint Luke’s Cancer Institute.

An artificial intelligence program called Profound AI uses algorithms to identify potential cancer in mammograms.

Meierotto and her team are using this new weapon in the battle against breast cancer.

“Studies show that radiologists who interpret with Profound AI find more cancers, have fewer false positives … and then can interpret mammograms in less time,” she said.

Meierotto says early detection through annual mammograms is key.

“The question is, are you going to know when it’s a teeny tiny treatable stage zero stage one cancer? Are you going to wait until it’s progressed and metastasized, you know, with a less than 20% survival rate?” she asked.

Meghan Geivett is living proof that early detection saves lives. She was diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer after her first routine mammogram at age 40. After chemotherapy and a double mastectomy, she’s now in remission.

She says getting diagnosed with breast cancer was the last thing she expected.

“I didn’t have a lump. I didn’t have any pain. I didn’t have anything that caused me to think I was gonna have breast cancer when I went in for my mammogram,” she said.

Doctors found four cancerous tumors, though. Geivett also didn’t have family history of breast cancer. Doctors say three in four breast cancer patients don’t have family history, but some still use that as an excuse to put off testing.

“In Megan’s case, had she waited, she may not be here today to tell her story,” Meierotto said.

Geivett is sharing her story as a warning to others.

“You can be young, you can be healthy, you can look great on the outside, but you have no idea what’s inside your body,” she said. “All you can do is get checked.”

Watch the video above for the full story.



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New AI technology helps doctors detect breast cancer



October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer faster and more accurately.Sister stationKMBC 9 found out how it works and talked to a survivor sharing her message about the importance of early detection. A tiny tumor can be hard to see with the naked eye, but new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer earlier than ever before. “Sometimes cancer is really obvious, but a lot of times it can be very subtle changes,” said Dr. Ruby Meierotto, a breast radiologist at Saint Luke’s Cancer Institute. An artificial intelligence program called Profound AI uses algorithms to identify potential cancer in mammograms.Meierotto and her team are using this new weapon in the battle against breast cancer. “Studies show that radiologists who interpret with Profound AI find more cancers, have fewer false positives … and then can interpret mammograms in less time,” she said. Meierotto says early detection through annual mammograms is key.“The question is, are you going to know when it’s a teeny tiny treatable stage zero stage one cancer? Are you going to wait until it’s progressed and metastasized, you know, with a less than 20% survival rate?” she asked. Meghan Geivett is living proof that early detection saves lives. She was diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer after her first routine mammogram at age 40. After chemotherapy and a double mastectomy, she’s now in remission. She says getting diagnosed with breast cancer was the last thing she expected.“I didn’t have a lump. I didn’t have any pain. I didn’t have anything that caused me to think I was gonna have breast cancer when I went in for my mammogram,” she said. Doctors found four cancerous tumors, though. Geivett also didn’t have family history of breast cancer. Doctors say three in four breast cancer patients don’t have family history, but some still use that as an excuse to put off testing.“In Megan’s case, had she waited, she may not be here today to tell her story,” Meierotto said.Geivett is sharing her story as a warning to others.“You can be young, you can be healthy, you can look great on the outside, but you have no idea what’s inside your body,” she said. “All you can do is get checked.”Watch the video above for the full story.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer faster and more accurately.

Sister stationKMBC 9 found out how it works and talked to a survivor sharing her message about the importance of early detection.

A tiny tumor can be hard to see with the naked eye, but new technology is helping doctors detect breast cancer earlier than ever before.

“Sometimes cancer is really obvious, but a lot of times it can be very subtle changes,” said Dr. Ruby Meierotto, a breast radiologist at Saint Luke’s Cancer Institute.

An artificial intelligence program called Profound AI uses algorithms to identify potential cancer in mammograms.

Meierotto and her team are using this new weapon in the battle against breast cancer.

“Studies show that radiologists who interpret with Profound AI find more cancers, have fewer false positives … and then can interpret mammograms in less time,” she said.

Meierotto says early detection through annual mammograms is key.

“The question is, are you going to know when it’s a teeny tiny treatable stage zero stage one cancer? Are you going to wait until it’s progressed and metastasized, you know, with a less than 20% survival rate?” she asked.

Meghan Geivett is living proof that early detection saves lives. She was diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer after her first routine mammogram at age 40. After chemotherapy and a double mastectomy, she’s now in remission.

She says getting diagnosed with breast cancer was the last thing she expected.

“I didn’t have a lump. I didn’t have any pain. I didn’t have anything that caused me to think I was gonna have breast cancer when I went in for my mammogram,” she said.

Doctors found four cancerous tumors, though. Geivett also didn’t have family history of breast cancer. Doctors say three in four breast cancer patients don’t have family history, but some still use that as an excuse to put off testing.

“In Megan’s case, had she waited, she may not be here today to tell her story,” Meierotto said.

Geivett is sharing her story as a warning to others.

“You can be young, you can be healthy, you can look great on the outside, but you have no idea what’s inside your body,” she said. “All you can do is get checked.”

Watch the video above for the full story.



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