Winter is difficult time for blood collection, says medical director


as cases of Covid 19, the flu and respiratory viruses increase. So does concern about the nation’s blood supply. To see an increase in the number of people getting sick and not eligible to donate while at the same time, the demand stays constant. American Red Cross Medical director Dr Baia Lasky says the fall and winter months are typically *** challenging time for collection adding to the problem this year. Some people believe they are ineligible because they’ve had the Covid or flu vaccine. There are no deferral periods after either the flu vaccine or the Covid vaccine or any boosters. Dr Lasky says there needs to be *** constant flow of donors to maintain the blood supply. Unlike other lifesaving treatments, blood donations cannot be stockpiled. Red cells have *** shelf life of 42 days. Platelets, five days. I have no intention of stopping. There’s no reason to William Katz has been donating blood for nearly four deck even after receiving the Covid 19 vaccine and flu shot, he has kept his regular donation schedule. I came in they said, okay, you can be eligible to donate again on december 28th. So they made an appointment for me. So it’s automatic. The Red Cross is hoping more people like William step up if you are healthy and symptom free in the coming months, it’s urging you to roll up *** sleeve and save lives daniel back is cBS news Los Angeles

Winter is often difficult time for blood collection, says medical director

As cases of COVID-19, the flu, and respiratory viruses increase, so does concern about the nation’s blood supply. This is the time of year when the Red Cross says it experiences a drop in life-saving blood donations, CBS News reports.“We see an increase in the number of people getting sick and not eligible to donate, while at the same time the demand stays constant,” says Dr. Baia Lasky, medical director of American Red Cross.According to Dr. Lasky, the fall and winter months are typically a challenging time for collection. Adding to the problem this year, some people believe they are ineligible because they’ve had the COVID-19 or flu vaccine. “There are no deferral periods after either the flu vaccine or the COVID vaccine or any boosters,” Dr. Lasky says.She says there needs to be a constant flow of donors to maintain the blood supply, CBS News reports. Unlike other lifesaving treatments, blood donations cannot be stockpiled. Red cells have a shelf life of 42 days. Platelets, five days.William Katz has been donating blood for nearly four decades. “I have no intention of stopping. There’s no reason to,” he says. Even after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine and flu shot he has kept his regular donation schedule. “When I came in, they said, okay, you can be eligible to donate again on December 28th. So, they made an appointment for me. So it’s automatic,” Katz says. The Red Cross is hoping more people like Katz step up. If you are healthy and symptom free in the coming months. It’s urging you to roll up a sleeve and save lives. The Red Cross estimates only about 3% of people eligible donate blood yearly. To learn more about donating, go to: redcrossblood.org

As cases of COVID-19, the flu, and respiratory viruses increase, so does concern about the nation’s blood supply. This is the time of year when the Red Cross says it experiences a drop in life-saving blood donations, CBS News reports.

“We see an increase in the number of people getting sick and not eligible to donate, while at the same time the demand stays constant,” says Dr. Baia Lasky, medical director of American Red Cross.

According to Dr. Lasky, the fall and winter months are typically a challenging time for collection. Adding to the problem this year, some people believe they are ineligible because they’ve had the COVID-19 or flu vaccine. “There are no deferral periods after either the flu vaccine or the COVID vaccine or any boosters,” Dr. Lasky says.

She says there needs to be a constant flow of donors to maintain the blood supply, CBS News reports. Unlike other lifesaving treatments, blood donations cannot be stockpiled. Red cells have a shelf life of 42 days. Platelets, five days.

William Katz has been donating blood for nearly four decades. “I have no intention of stopping. There’s no reason to,” he says. Even after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine and flu shot he has kept his regular donation schedule. “When I came in, they said, okay, you can be eligible to donate again on December 28th. So, they made an appointment for me. So it’s automatic,” Katz says.

The Red Cross is hoping more people like Katz step up. If you are healthy and symptom free in the coming months. It’s urging you to roll up a sleeve and save lives.

The Red Cross estimates only about 3% of people eligible donate blood yearly. To learn more about donating, go to: redcrossblood.org



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